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Entrepreneurial skills start early

Published on 21/02/14

Finding opportunities to develop entrepreneurial skills in a normal school curriculum is always difficult, especially in the primary setting, but our commitment to integrated learning opportunities allows us to make time for special projects to do just this.

Entrepreneurs beware - Year 4 have entered the drinks market and taken it by storm!


Finding opportunities to develop entrepreneurial skills in a normal school curriculum is always difficult, especially in the primary setting, but our commitment to integrated learning opportunities allows us to make time for special projects to do just this.

The children learn to work collaboratively, sharing out tasks, making decisions and meeting deadlines - effectively directing their own learning. But even more importantly, a project like this gives them an opportunity to develop their learning character as they practise perseverance and flexibility, use their creativity, take risks and develop resilience within a safe and supportive environment.

The task:

Developing a new drink for children’s parties has been the focus of the latest cross curricular project in the Junior School. Armed with a selection of fruit juices, ginger ale and lemonade Year 4 set about developing fruit juice cocktails, with plenty of tasting on the way, just to make sure the balance was right of course. With names such as Necker Punch and Fruitastic, they developed a questionnaire and took freshly labelled bottles of their creations into the playground to conduct their market research. The new products were very popular with the target market and valuable feedback was collected for the designers. Once all the results had been collated and the graphs drawn and interpreted, it was time to develop their pitches using iMovie. They were soon to be spotted all over the school filming interviews, recording voiceovers, downloading stills, and adding backing tracks to their presentations. The final challenge of the project was a Dragons’ Den experience in which they pitched their products to Year 3 drinks manufacturers, companies like, ‘Fizz Pop Shop’ and ‘Penguin Drive Limited’, who soon sent feedback letters causing each pair to cross their fingers and toes hoping that their creation had been chosen for production.